National Magazine Exchange

Believe it or not, I lasted more than one day at Special Data Processing, now known as National Magazine Exchange.  I lasted two days there back in 1997.

Every telemarketing place has a wrinkle, and SDP/NME is no different.  Their wrinkle is they treat everyone the same, employees and callers alike: like crap.  They also have a policy that if you leave the company on bad terms or just leave, they put you through a committee you’re not allowed to take part in.  Most former employees aren’t welcomed back, no matter when you were hired.

For instance, I was hired in 1997.  As I’m writing this blog entry, I am filling out an online application at NME, just to demonstrate that even 15 years later, I can’t get hired there.  Of course, when I took the training class, they don’t tell you that they blacklist you for life.  You find that out after the fact.

As I go to question 19 on the first page of the application, they ask me:

“Do you agree to abide by all Company Policies and Expectations, including Attendance & Dress Code?”

Now, I haven’t seen the policies and expectations as of yet, so how can I agree to policies and expectations without having any idea what they are?  So I click no.  Remarkably, the application doesn’t kick me out.  After completing the application, it sends me to a page called “Application For Rehire.”

I’m asked why I left, and why I should be rehired. They don’t leave me enough text to answer the questions in full.  When I get to the question about why I should be rehired, I answered: you’ll do what you want regardless of how I answer this question.

What, like I’m going to tell them I’m blogging about them?

And of course, when I go to submit my Rehire App, I get some kind of HTTP error.  Ironic that a waste of a place just wasted several minutes of my time.

National Magazine Exchange